Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

YOW Brisbane 2015

December 13, 2015

The YOW conference is very kind to local meetup organisers, I was lucky enough to be offered a ticket in return for introducing a couple of sessions.

Monday

Keynote: Adrian Cockcroft

Complexity, understanding, composition and abstraction.

Past, Present and Future of Java: Georges Saab

Some of the new fp/multi core stuff slowly coming down the pipeline. I’ve always had high expectations for Java and the surrounding environment, but every time I’ve used it I’ve been very disappointed. There’s a lot to be said for backwards compatibility, but not at the cost of destroying all the good will your development community has. The changes portrayed in this talk are quite interesting.

Play in C#: Mads Torgersen

This was a highlight of the conference for me. The Roslyn project basically inverted the Microsoft compiler from a sink to a filter which lets it be hooked up directly to the IDE. The live example was adding a linter to the IDE to complain about blocks of code not in brace extensions, complete with one click fixup. It was all very impressive.

Writing a writer: Richard P. Gabriel

Generating poems that get judged to be written by humans, all in lisp of course.

Keynote: Don Reinertsen

This was a very interesting discussion on the natural reaction in an uncertain world: making systems robust. At the very best, the most robust system (robustest? :) will be able to handle the most chaotic world and bring system performance back to normal. This talk asks us to think about the notion of a system that can actually improve in a chaotic world. The theoretic model is based on the financial idea of increasing risk implying increasing returns.

The Future of Software Engineering: Glenn Vanderburg

This was a very interesting talk on the nature of engineering, and how software engineering fits into the discipline. A highlight.

The Miracle of Generators: Bodil Stokke

This was an FP talk, I’m not a fan of bait-and-switch talks.

Tuesday:

NASA Keynote: Anita Sengupta and Kamal Oudrhiri

It’s interesting to be in a room full of engineers being exposed to different engineering requirements.

Agile is Dead: Dave Thomas

A great simplification of the underlying ideas of how to have agility.

Sometimes the Questions are Complicated, but the Answers are Simple: Indu Alagarsamy

A highlight of the conference overall, a talk about a healthy family culture butting up against backwards societal culture.

Keynote: Kathleen Fisher

Formal processes work, but we’re decades off being able to use them for day to day work.

Always Keep a Benchmark in your Back Pocket: Simon Garland

Some rules to keep in mind around designing  benchmark, plus the idea of always doing benchmarking as a way of defending development work to management keen on outsourcing.

Transcript: Jonathan Edwards

One of the talks I chaired.  A very interesting document and form based programming language for non-programmers to use, in the style of hypercard.

The Mother of all Programming Languages Demos: Sean McDirmid

One of the talks I chaired. More interesting ideas coming out of Microsoft. This was heavily based on physical interfaces, I struggled to think how it would apply to regular programming.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kiwi PyCon quick reviews

September 12, 2015

Recommended:

  • Keynote, Brenda Wallace, State of Copyright. Lots of interesting information, NZ centric though (naturally) video
  • Keynote, Allison Kaptur, Ways we can be more effective learners. Focusing on the idea of a mindset, the context of our learning and different approaches, a hilight of the conference for me video
  • Keynote, Katie Bell, Python as a Teaching Language video
  • Brian Thorne, Blind Analytics, algorithms on encrypted data. I’ll probably have to watch this fifty times to actually understand.Video
  • Katie McLaughlin, Build a Better Hat Rack. Being nice in open source, not assuming that people know your work is appreciated. not all work is code.video
  • Chris Neugebauer, Python’s type hints, in comparison to Javascripts. A very promising talk about the future of type hinting in python. video
  • Martin Henschke, Eloise “Ducky” Macdonald-Meyer, Coding workshops for school kids in Tasmania. Similar outcomes to the keynote. video
  • Tim Mitchell, Database Migrations using alembic, programmatically upgrading database scemas, hilights for me were the use cases. The example used was a good one as it’s multi staged (it’s a bad example for other reasons :) video
  • Jeremy Stott, Practical Web Security, takes a hobby project and secures it. Lots of little tips. video
  • Thomi Richards, Connascence in Python, a language for talking about the different types of coupling video
  • Cory Benfield, You Don’t care About Efficiency. All about sync code wasting cpu cycles while IO is happening, don’t do that. Doesn’t cover threading though. video
  • Lee Symes, Why Python is awesome, always good to see how languages are learning off each other video
  • Various (including myself), Lightning talks video

Wishlist:

  • Ben Shaw, Micro-Services: Is HTTP the only way? video
  • Chris LeBlanc, Cython, I’ve done a lot of Cython, but there’s a a lot of features and it’s a fast moving target video
  • Steve Baker, The Pythonista’s 3D printing toolchain video
  • Tom Eastmen, security. Tom gives lightning talk about serial protocols everywhere, based on that, this should be good video
  • Fraser Tweedale, Integrating Python apps with Centralised Identity systems. I believe that this talk is mostly focused on configuring your web server to do authnz, rather than coding it incorrectly. video
  • Rand Huso, MPI and IoC video
  • Gagan Sharma, Simon Salinas, Custom Python Applications in Neuroscience video

Comments:

  • Fei Long Wang, Zaqar, struggled to find a reason this exists, it might just need to exist to be an open replacement for SQS. video
  • WxPython Tuning app for FreeEMS, a Python app taking serial data from a car control system. They jumped to using threads and mutexes and things and didn’t seem to try to use an async read from the serial port, when they were already using a GUI mainloop. I asked why not, but they didn’t seem to understand my question. There doesn’t appear to be a video, may be because of a poorly named command line tool that sounds like a swear word.

PyCon Australia 2015 Programme Released

June 24, 2015

PyCon Australia is proud to release our programme for 2015, spread over the weekend of August 1st and 2nd, following our Miniconfs on Friday 31 July.

Following our largest ever response to our Call for Proposals, we are able to present two keynotes, forty eight talks and two tutorials. The conference will feature four full tracks of presentations, covering all aspects of the Python ecosystem, presented by experts and core developers of key Python technology. Our presenters cover a broad range of backgrounds, including industry, research, government and academia.

We are still finalising our Miniconf timetable, but we expect another thirty talks for Friday. We’d like to highlight the inaugural running of the Education Miniconf whose primary aim is to bring educators and the Python community closer together.

The full schedule for PyCon Australia 2015 can be found at http://2015.pycon-au.org/programme/about

PyCon Australia has endeavoured to keep tickets as affordable as possible. We are able to do so, thanks to our Sponsors and Contributors. Registrations for PyCon Australia 2015 are now open, with prices starting at AU$50 for students, and tickets for the general public starting at AU$240. All prices include GST, and more information can be found at http://2015.pycon-au.org/register/prices

We have also worked out favourable deals with accommodation providers for PyCon delegates. Find out more about the options at http://2015.pycon-au.org/register/accommodation

To begin the registration process, and find out more about each level of ticket, visit http://2015.pycon-au.org/register/prices
Important Dates to Help You Plan

June 29: Financial Assistance program closes.
July 8: Last day to Order PyCon Australia 2015 T-shirts
July 19: Last day to Advise Special Dietary Requirements
July 31 : PyCon Australia 2015 Begins

About PyCon Australia

PyCon Australia is the national conference for the Python Programming Community. The sixth PyCon Australia will be held on July 31 through August 4th, 2015 in Brisbane, bringing together professional, student and enthusiast developers with a love for developing with Python. PyCon Australia informs the country’s Python developers with presentations, tutorials and panel sessions by experts and core developers of Python, as well as the libraries and frameworks that they rely on.

To find out more about PyCon Australia 2015, visit our website at http://pycon-au.org or e-mail us at contact@pycon-au.org.

PyCon Australia is presented by Linux Australia (www.linux.org.au) and acknowledges the support of our Platinum Sponsors, Red Hat Asia-Pacific, and Netbox Blue; and our Gold sponsors, The Australian Signals Directorate and Google Australia. For full details of our sponsors, see our website.

PyCon Australia 2015 Early Bird Registrations Now Open!

June 12, 2015

We are delighted to announce that online registration is now open for PyCon Australia 2015. The sixth PyCon Australia is being held in Brisbane, Queensland from July 31st – 4th August at the Pullman Brisbane and is expected to draw hundreds of Python developers, enthusiasts and students from Australasia and afar.

Starting today, early bird offers are up for grabs. To take advantage of these discounted ticket rates, be among the first 100 to register. Early bird registration starts from $50 for full-time students, $180 for enthusiasts and $460 for professionals. Offers this good won’t last long, so head straight to http://2015.pycon-au.org and register right away.

PyCon Australia has endeavoured to keep tickets as affordable as possible. We are able to do so, thanks to our Sponsors and Contributors.

We have also worked out favourable deals with accommodation providers for PyCon delegates. Find out more about the options at http://2015.pycon-au.org/register/accommodation

To begin the registration process, and find out more about each level of ticket, visit http://2015.pycon-au.org/register/prices
Important Dates to Help You Plan

June 8: Early Bird Registration Opens — open to the first 100 tickets
June 29: Financial Assistance program closes.
July 8: Last day to Order PyCon Australia 2015 T-shirts
July 19: Last day to Advise Special Dietary Requirements
July 31 : PyCon Australia 2015 Begins

About PyCon Australia

PyCon Australia is the national conference for the Python Programming Community. The sixth PyCon Australia will be held on July 31 through August 4th, 2015 in Brisbane, bringing together professional, student and enthusiast developers with a love for developing with Python. PyCon Australia informs the country’s Python developers with presentations, tutorials and panel sessions by experts and core developers of Python, as well as the libraries and frameworks that they rely on.

To find out more about PyCon Australia 2015, visit our website at http://pycon-au.org or e-mail us at contact@pycon-au.org.

PyCon Australia is presented by Linux Australia (www.linux.org.au) and acknowledges the support of our Platinum Sponsors, Red Hat Asia-Pacific, and Netbox Blue; and our Gold sponsors, The Australian Signals Directorate and Google Australia. For full details of our sponsors, see our website.

One Week Left for PyCon Australia 2015 Proposals!

May 2, 2015


Under a week to go – closes Friday 8th May

With just under a week to go until the PyCon Australia 2015 Call for Proposals closes, we thought it would be a good idea to give everyone an update and a reminder. We’re very happy with the proposals we’ve already received, but we’re eager to receive more! We hope our proposal writing working bees in Brisbane have been of help, and hope to roll them out to more cities next year. If you’ve got any questions please get in touch (numerous contact details are up on pycon-au.org). We would like to give a special shout out for the Education MiniConf, which is new this year: if you know people teaching and using computing in the education realm, please forward this CFP on.

The deadline for proposal submission is Friday 8th May, 2015.


Conference

The conference this year will be held on Saturday 1st and Sunday 2nd August 2015 in Brisbane. PyCon Australia attracts professional developers from all walks of life, including industry, government, and science, as well as enthusiast and student developers. We’re looking for proposals for presentations and tutorials on any aspect of Python programming, at all skill levels from novice to advanced.
Presentation subjects may range from reports on open source, academic or commercial projects; or even tutorials and case studies. If a presentation is interesting and useful to the Python community, it will be considered for inclusion in the program.
We’re especially interested in short presentations that will teach conference-goers something new and useful. Can you show attendees how to use a module? Explore a Python language feature? Package an application?

Miniconfs

Four Miniconfs will be held on Friday 31st July, as a prelude to the main conference. Miniconfs are run by community members and are separate to the main conference. If you are a first time speaker, or your talk is targeted to a particular field, the Miniconfs might be a better fit than the main part of the conference. If your proposal is not selected for the main part of the conference, it may be selected for one of our Miniconfs:
DjangoCon AU is the annual conference of Django users in the Southern Hemisphere. It covers all aspects of web software development, from design to deployment – and, of course, the use of the Django framework itself. It provides an excellent opportunity to discuss the state of the art of web software development with other developers and designers.
The Python in Education Miniconf aims to bring together community workshop organisers, professional Python instructors and professional educators across primary, secondary and tertiary levels to share their experiences and requirements, and identify areas of potential collaboration with each other and also with the broader Python community.
The Science and Data Miniconf is a forum for people using Python to tackle problems in science and data analysis. It aims to cover commercial and research interests in applications of science, engineering, mathematics, finance, and data analysis using Python, including AI and ‘big data’ topics.
The OpenStack Miniconf is dedicated to talks related to the OpenStack project and we welcome proposals of all kinds: technical, community, infrastructure or code talks/discussions; academic or commercial applications; or even tutorials and case studies. If a presentation is interesting and useful to the OpenStack community, it will be considered for inclusion. We also welcome talks that have been given previously in different events.

First Time Speakers

We welcome first-time speakers; we are a community conference and we are eager to hear about your experience. If you have friends or colleagues who have something valuable to contribute, twist their arms to tell us about it! Please also forward this Call for Proposals to anyone that you feel may be interested.

The most recent call for proposals information can always be found at: pycon-au.org/cfp

See you in Brisbane in July!

Important Dates

Call for Proposals opens: Friday 27th March, 2015
Proposal submission deadline: Friday 8th May, 2015
Proposal acceptance: Monday 25 May, 2015

PyCon Australia 2015 Proposal Writing Working Bee

April 10, 2015

Writing your first conference proposal can be difficult, so we’re running a working bee at UQ on Saturday 11th (in conjunction with Humbug). If you’ve never written a conference proposal before, or you’d like yours given the once over, please come along, register over at meetup.

PyCon Australia 2015 Call for Proposals is Open!

March 28, 2015

PyCon Australia 2015 is pleased to announce that its Call for Proposals is now open!
The conference this year will be held on Saturday 1st and Sunday 2nd August 2015 in Brisbane. We’ll also be featuring a day of Miniconfs on Friday 31st July.

The deadline for proposal submission is Friday 8th May, 2015.

PyCon Australia attracts professional developers from all walks of life, including industry, government, and science, as well as enthusiast and student developers. We’re looking for proposals for presentations and tutorials on any aspect of Python programming, at all skill levels from novice to advanced.

Presentation subjects may range from reports on open source, academic or commercial projects; or even tutorials and case studies. If a presentation is interesting and useful to the Python community, it will be considered for inclusion in the program.

We’re especially interested in short presentations that will teach conference-goers something new and useful. Can you show attendees how to use a module? Explore a Python language feature? Package an application?

Miniconfs

Four Miniconfs will be held on Friday 31st July, as a prelude to the main conference. Miniconfs are run by community members and are separate to the main conference. If you are a first time speaker, or your talk is targeted to a particular field, the Miniconfs might be a better fit than the main part of the conference. If your proposal is not selected for the main part of the conference, it may be selected for one of our Miniconfs:

DjangoCon AU is the annual conference of Django users in the Southern Hemisphere. It covers all aspects of web software development, from design to deployment – and, of course, the use of the Django framework itself. It provides an excellent opportunity to discuss the state of the art of web software development with other developers and designers.

The Python in Education Miniconf aims to bring together community workshop organisers, professional Python instructors and professional educators across primary, secondary and tertiary levels to share their experiences and requirements, and identify areas of potential collaboration with each other and also with the broader Python community.

The Science and Data Miniconf is a forum for people using Python to tackle problems in science and data analysis. It aims to cover commercial and research interests in applications of science, engineering, mathematics, finance, and data analysis using Python, including AI and ‘big data’ topics.

The OpenStack Miniconf is dedicated to talks related to the OpenStack project and we welcome proposals of all kinds: technical, community, infrastructure or code talks/discussions; academic or commercial applications; or even tutorials and case studies. If a presentation is interesting and useful to the OpenStack community, it will be considered for inclusion. We also welcome talks that have been given previously in different events.

Full details: http://2015.pycon-au.org/cfp

Tuesday 24th February

February 25, 2015

Walked to work.

While doing some conference stuff, discovered that I hate printers. It took something like an hour to print out two pages of basic text and one image. Whatever pdf version every tool was spitting out, was not handled at all well by either printer.

Friday 30th January

January 31, 2015

Work.

Got the pyconau15 landing page done, a small yay.

Working on slides for the lca debrief tomorrow.

PyCon Australia Call for Proposals closes Friday 25th April

April 21, 2014

There’s less than a week left to get your proposal in for PyCon Australia 2014, Australia’s national Python Conference. We focus on first time speakers so please get in touch if you have any questions. The full details are available at http://2014.pycon-au.org/cfp

 

 

 


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